Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry - University of Maryland, College Park MD Calendar http://www.chem.umd.edu University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742: My Calendar Events en-US chem-it@umd.edu (Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry - University of Maryland, College Park MD Admin) My Calendar WordPress Plugin http://www.joedolson.com/my-calendar/ Fri, 09 Jun 2017 09:26:48 +0000 Exploring Endoglycosidases for Antibody Glycosylation Remodeling http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=270 Tue, 23 May 2017 19:53:47 +0000 dcanter Biochemistry Graduate Student Seminar

Mr. Xin Tong, UMCP, (Advisor: Professor Lai-Xi Wang)

 

]]>
2017-05-26T15:30:00 2017-05-26T16:30:00

Exploring Endoglycosidases for Antibody Glycosylation Remodeling

Biochemistry Graduate Student Seminar

Mr. Xin Tong, UMCP, (Advisor: Professor Lai-Xi Wang)

 

Begins: 3:30 pm on May 26, 2017

Ends: 4:30 pm on May 26, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 2118, Biomolecular Sciences Building (296)
Exploring Endoglycosidases for Antibody Glycosylation Remodeling ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=270
Molecular Routes to Sorting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=267 Fri, 19 May 2017 13:45:22 +0000 dcanter Mr. Brendan Meany, UMCP, PhD Defense, (Advisor: Professor YuHuang Wang)

]]>
2017-05-23T10:00:00 2017-05-23T11:00:00

Molecular Routes to Sorting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

Mr. Brendan Meany, UMCP, PhD Defense, (Advisor: Professor YuHuang Wang)

Begins: 10:00 am on May 23, 2017

Ends: 11:00 am on May 23, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 0112, Marker Seminar Room, Chemistry Building (091)
Molecular Routes to Sorting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=267
Untitled Event http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=266 Mon, 08 May 2017 16:05:25 +0000 dcanter 2017-05-08T00:00:00 2017-05-08T23:59:59

Untitled Event

Begins: N/A on May 8, 2017

Ends: on May 8, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Untitled Event ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=266
Understading the Relationships Between Architecture, Chemistry, and Energy Release of Energetic Nanocomposites http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=265 Mon, 08 May 2017 16:05:05 +0000 dcanter Mr. Jeffery DeLisio, UMCP, PhD Defense, (Advisor: Professor Michael Zachariah),

]]>
2017-05-08T15:00:00 2017-05-08T16:00:00

Understading the Relationships Between Architecture, Chemistry, and Energy Release of Energetic Nanocomposites

Mr. Jeffery DeLisio, UMCP, PhD Defense, (Advisor: Professor Michael Zachariah),

Begins: 3:00 pm on May 8, 2017

Ends: 4:00 pm on May 8, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 0112, Marker Seminar Room, Chemistry Building (091)
Understading the Relationships Between Architecture, Chemistry, and Energy Release of Energetic Nanocomposites ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=265
Lanthanide-Doped Nanoparticles: Core/Shell Structure and Application in Bioimaging http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=263 Thu, 27 Apr 2017 18:56:13 +0000 dcanter Ms. Xiaoying Lin, UMCP, Student Seminar, (Advisor: Professor Zhihong Nie)

]]>
2017-05-10T14:00:00 2017-05-10T15:00:00

Lanthanide-Doped Nanoparticles: Core/Shell Structure and Application in Bioimaging

Ms. Xiaoying Lin, UMCP, Student Seminar, (Advisor: Professor Zhihong Nie)

Begins: 2:00 pm on May 10, 2017

Ends: 3:00 pm on May 10, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 0112, Marker Seminar Room, Chemistry Building (091)
Lanthanide-Doped Nanoparticles: Core/Shell Structure and Application in Bioimaging ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=263
Manipulating Light, Mass and Energy Using Plasmonic Nanotechnology http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=242 Wed, 29 Mar 2017 17:38:23 +0000 dcanter Professor Yuebing Zheng, University of Texas at Austin

]]>
2017-05-10T11:00:00 2017-05-10T12:00:00

Manipulating Light, Mass and Energy Using Plasmonic Nanotechnology

Professor Yuebing Zheng, University of Texas at Austin

Begins: 11:00 am on May 10, 2017

Ends: 12:00 pm on May 10, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 0112, Marker Seminar Room, Chemistry Building (091)
Manipulating Light, Mass and Energy Using Plasmonic Nanotechnology ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=242
Janus Particles as Efficient 'Compatibilizers' for Immiscible Polymer Blends http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=259 Thu, 20 Apr 2017 14:15:38 +0000 dcanter Ms. Chelsey Lamar, UMCP, Student Seminar, (Advisor: Professor Zhihong Nie)

]]>
2017-05-03T11:00:00 2017-05-03T12:00:00

Janus Particles as Efficient 'Compatibilizers' for Immiscible Polymer Blends

Ms. Chelsey Lamar, UMCP, Student Seminar, (Advisor: Professor Zhihong Nie)

Begins: 11:00 am on May 3, 2017

Ends: 12:00 pm on May 3, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 0112, Marker Seminar Room, Chemistry Building (091)
Janus Particles as Efficient 'Compatibilizers' for Immiscible Polymer Blends ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=259
RNA Therapeutics: Insights into the Targeting of an RNA Element from the Hepatitis B Virus http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=269 Thu, 20 Apr 2017 14:13:33 +0000 dcanter Mr. Andrew Longhini, UMCP, PhD Defense, (Advisor: Professor Kwaku Dayie)

]]>
2017-04-24T13:00:00 2017-04-24T14:00:00

RNA Therapeutics: Insights into the Targeting of an RNA Element from the Hepatitis B Virus

Mr. Andrew Longhini, UMCP, PhD Defense, (Advisor: Professor Kwaku Dayie)

Begins: 1:00 pm on April 24, 2017

Ends: 2:00 pm on April 24, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 2118, Biomolecular Sciences Building (296)
RNA Therapeutics: Insights into the Targeting of an RNA Element from the Hepatitis B Virus ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=269
The Design and Synthesis of Rotaxane-Based Molecular Pumps for the Transport of Small Molecules http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=257 Mon, 17 Apr 2017 20:07:27 +0000 dcanter Mr. Kyle Webb, UMCP, Student Seminar, (Advisor: Professor Zhihong Nie)

]]>
2017-04-19T11:00:00 2017-04-19T12:00:00

The Design and Synthesis of Rotaxane-Based Molecular Pumps for the Transport of Small Molecules

Mr. Kyle Webb, UMCP, Student Seminar, (Advisor: Professor Zhihong Nie)

Begins: 11:00 am on April 19, 2017

Ends: 12:00 pm on April 19, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 0112, Marker Seminar Room, Chemistry Building (091)
The Design and Synthesis of Rotaxane-Based Molecular Pumps for the Transport of Small Molecules ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=257
Analysis of Genetic Regulatory Mechanisms that Control Ethanolamine Utilization in Enterococcus faecalis http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=248 Fri, 14 Apr 2017 16:40:40 +0000 dcanter Ms. Margo Gebbie, UMCP, PhD Defense, (Advisor: Professor Wade Winkler)

]]>
2017-05-18T14:00:00 2017-05-18T15:00:00

Analysis of Genetic Regulatory Mechanisms that Control Ethanolamine Utilization in Enterococcus faecalis

Ms. Margo Gebbie, UMCP, PhD Defense, (Advisor: Professor Wade Winkler)

Begins: 2:00 pm on May 18, 2017

Ends: 3:00 pm on May 18, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 1103, BRB Building
Analysis of Genetic Regulatory Mechanisms that Control Ethanolamine Utilization in Enterococcus faecalis ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=248
Managing Safety in Academia, Industry, and Government Laboratories: Expectations for Graduates Entering the Workforce http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=246 Mon, 10 Apr 2017 17:24:35 +0000 dcanter Special Panel Seminar/Discussion

Jointly sponsored by ESSR, Dept. of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Dept. of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering
]]>
2017-04-26T15:00:00 2017-04-26T16:00:00

Managing Safety in Academia, Industry, and Government Laboratories: Expectations for Graduates Entering the Workforce

Special Panel Seminar/Discussion

Jointly sponsored by ESSR, Dept. of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Dept. of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering

Begins: 3:00 pm on April 26, 2017

Ends: 4:00 pm on April 26, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

1107/1111 Kim Engineering Building
Managing Safety in Academia, Industry, and Government Laboratories: Expectations for Graduates Entering the Workforce ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=246
Catalysis: Two Examples, Applied and Fundamental, from Industry http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=247 Mon, 10 Apr 2017 16:57:34 +0000 dcanter Dr. Kenneth Moloy, Program Director, Division of Chemistry, NSF

 

Short Bio.: Kenneth Moloy is a Program Director in the Division of Chemistry at
the National Science Foundation.  He received his BS from Indiana
(Chemistry, 1980, Caulton) and his Ph.D. from Northwestern (Inorganic
Chemistry, 1984, Marks). Following graduate school he worked in long
range research for Union Carbide Corporation.  In 1995 he moved to
DuPont and spent his entire DuPont career in Central Research &
Development.  Dr. Moloy left DuPont as a Research Fellow in 2016 to
join NSF.  His expertise lies in the areas of organometallic
chemistry, catalysis, organic chemistry, and process chemistry. Dr.
Moloy has chaired the Gordon Research Conference on Organometallic
Chemistry and the Organometallic Subdivision of the ACS Division of
Inorganic Chemistry.  He is a past member of the Chemical Sciences
Roundtable in the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and
Medicine, and has served the Academies through several activities
toward improving academic laboratory safety, including the committee
responsible for the most recent version (2011) of the NAS publication
"Prudent Practices in the Laboratory"

]]>
2017-04-12T13:00:00 2017-04-12T14:00:00

Catalysis: Two Examples, Applied and Fundamental, from Industry

Dr. Kenneth Moloy, Program Director, Division of Chemistry, NSF

 

Short Bio.: Kenneth Moloy is a Program Director in the Division of Chemistry at
the National Science Foundation.  He received his BS from Indiana
(Chemistry, 1980, Caulton) and his Ph.D. from Northwestern (Inorganic
Chemistry, 1984, Marks). Following graduate school he worked in long
range research for Union Carbide Corporation.  In 1995 he moved to
DuPont and spent his entire DuPont career in Central Research &
Development.  Dr. Moloy left DuPont as a Research Fellow in 2016 to
join NSF.  His expertise lies in the areas of organometallic
chemistry, catalysis, organic chemistry, and process chemistry. Dr.
Moloy has chaired the Gordon Research Conference on Organometallic
Chemistry and the Organometallic Subdivision of the ACS Division of
Inorganic Chemistry.  He is a past member of the Chemical Sciences
Roundtable in the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and
Medicine, and has served the Academies through several activities
toward improving academic laboratory safety, including the committee
responsible for the most recent version (2011) of the NAS publication
"Prudent Practices in the Laboratory"

Begins: 1:00 pm on April 12, 2017

Ends: 2:00 pm on April 12, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 0112, Marker Seminar Room, Chemistry Building (091)
Catalysis: Two Examples, Applied and Fundamental, from Industry ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=247
Light-Driven Chemical Creation of Fluorescent Quantum Defects http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=243 Mon, 10 Apr 2017 16:55:14 +0000 dcanter Ms. Lyndsey Powell, UMCP, Ph.D. Defense, (Advisor: Professor YuHuang Wang)

]]>
2017-04-18T10:00:00 2017-04-18T11:00:00

Light-Driven Chemical Creation of Fluorescent Quantum Defects

Ms. Lyndsey Powell, UMCP, Ph.D. Defense, (Advisor: Professor YuHuang Wang)

Begins: 10:00 am on April 18, 2017

Ends: 11:00 am on April 18, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 0112, Marker Seminar Room, Chemistry Building (091)
Light-Driven Chemical Creation of Fluorescent Quantum Defects ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=243
Collision Dynamics of Highly Oriented Super Roter Molecules from an Optical Centrifuge http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=241 Mon, 27 Mar 2017 14:50:35 +0000 dcanter Mr. Matthew Murray, UMCP, PhD Defense, Chemical Physics, (Advisor: Professor Amy Mullin)

]]>
2017-03-30T13:00:00 2017-03-30T14:00:00

Collision Dynamics of Highly Oriented Super Roter Molecules from an Optical Centrifuge

Mr. Matthew Murray, UMCP, PhD Defense, Chemical Physics, (Advisor: Professor Amy Mullin)

Begins: 1:00 pm on March 30, 2017

Ends: 2:00 pm on March 30, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 0112, Marker Seminar Room, Chemistry Building (091)
Collision Dynamics of Highly Oriented Super Roter Molecules from an Optical Centrifuge ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=241
The Development of Novel Optical Materials Using Sulfur Based Chemistry http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=240 Mon, 27 Mar 2017 14:44:29 +0000 dcanter Dr. Darryl A. Boyd, Research Chemist, U.S. Naval Research Lab

]]>
2017-03-29T18:00:00 2017-03-29T19:00:00

The Development of Novel Optical Materials Using Sulfur Based Chemistry

Dr. Darryl A. Boyd, Research Chemist, U.S. Naval Research Lab

Begins: 6:00 pm on March 29, 2017

Ends: 7:00 pm on March 29, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 1402, Chemistry Lecture Hall, Chemistry Building (091)
The Development of Novel Optical Materials Using Sulfur Based Chemistry ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=240
Bio-inspired Bimetallic Complexes for Activating H2 and CO2 http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=262 Mon, 27 Mar 2017 14:25:48 +0000 dcanter Professor Connie Liu, University of Minnesota

]]>
2017-04-27T11:00:00 2017-04-27T12:00:00

Bio-inspired Bimetallic Complexes for Activating H2 and CO2

Professor Connie Liu, University of Minnesota

Begins: 11:00 am on April 27, 2017

Ends: 12:00 pm on April 27, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 0112, Marker Seminar Room, Chemistry Building (091)
Bio-inspired Bimetallic Complexes for Activating H2 and CO2 ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=262
Intramolecular Carbon-Nitrogen Reductive Elimination from Isolated Monohydrocarbyl Palladium(IV, d6) Complexes Using H2O2 as Terminal Oxidant http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=238 Mon, 27 Mar 2017 14:07:49 +0000 dcanter Mr. Elikplim Abada, UMCP, PhD Defense, (Advisor: Professor Andrei Vedernikov)

]]>
2017-03-27T14:00:00 2017-03-27T15:00:00

Intramolecular Carbon-Nitrogen Reductive Elimination from Isolated Monohydrocarbyl Palladium(IV, d6) Complexes Using H2O2 as Terminal Oxidant

Mr. Elikplim Abada, UMCP, PhD Defense, (Advisor: Professor Andrei Vedernikov)

Begins: 2:00 pm on March 27, 2017

Ends: 3:00 pm on March 27, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 0112, Marker Seminar Room, Chemistry Building (091)
Intramolecular Carbon-Nitrogen Reductive Elimination from Isolated Monohydrocarbyl Palladium(IV, d6) Complexes Using H2O2 as Terminal Oxidant ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=238
Pushing the Functional Limits of Clothing Systems http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=237 Wed, 01 Mar 2017 14:43:16 +0000 dcanter Dr. Jintu Fan, Vincent V. C. Woo Professor in Fiber Science, Cornell University

]]>
2017-03-02T15:00:00 2017-03-02T16:00:00

Pushing the Functional Limits of Clothing Systems

Dr. Jintu Fan, Vincent V. C. Woo Professor in Fiber Science, Cornell University

Begins: 3:00 pm on March 2, 2017

Ends: 4:00 pm on March 2, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 0112, Marker Seminar Room, Chemistry Building (091)
Pushing the Functional Limits of Clothing Systems ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=237
Structural Basis of Microtube Dynamic Instability and its Regulation http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=249 Tue, 21 Feb 2017 16:06:51 +0000 dcanter Professor Eva Nogales, University of California, Berkeley, Lawrence Berekely Labs

]]>
2017-05-02T11:00:00 2017-05-02T13:00:00

Structural Basis of Microtube Dynamic Instability and its Regulation

Professor Eva Nogales, University of California, Berkeley, Lawrence Berekely Labs

Begins: 11:00 am on May 2, 2017

Ends: 1:00 pm on May 2, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 0112, Marker Seminar Room, Chemistry Building (091)
Structural Basis of Microtube Dynamic Instability and its Regulation ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=249
Structure-Based Vaccine Design http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=226 Thu, 26 Jan 2017 22:01:30 +0000 dcanter Dr. Peter Kwong, NIH

]]>
2017-05-02T11:00:00 2017-05-02T12:00:00

Structure-Based Vaccine Design

Dr. Peter Kwong, NIH

Begins: 11:00 am on May 2, 2017

Ends: 12:00 pm on May 2, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 0112, Marker Seminar Room, Chemistry Building (091)
Structure-Based Vaccine Design ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=226
Visualization of the Human Transcription Initiation Machinery http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=235 Tue, 21 Feb 2017 16:05:59 +0000 dcanter Professor Eva Nogales, University of California, Berkeley, Lawrence Berkeley Labs

ABSTRACT

markerEukaryotic gene transcription requires the assembly at the promoter of a large pre-initiation complex (PIC) that includes RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and the general transcription factors TFIID, TFIIA, TFIIB, TFIIF, TFIIE, and TFIIH. The size and complexity of Pol II, TFIID, and TFIIH have precluded their reconstitution from heterologous systems, and purification relies on scarce endogenous sources. Together with their conformational flexibility and the transient nature of their interactions, these limitations had precluded structural characterization of the PIC. In the last few years, however,progress in cryo–electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has made possible the visualization, at increasingly better resolution, of large PIC assemblies in different functional states. These structures can now be interpreted in near-atomic detail and provide an exciting structural framework for past and future functional studies, giving us unique mechanistic insight into the complex process of transcription initiation

]]>
2017-05-01T16:00:00 2017-05-01T17:00:00

Visualization of the Human Transcription Initiation Machinery

Professor Eva Nogales, University of California, Berkeley, Lawrence Berkeley Labs

ABSTRACT

markerEukaryotic gene transcription requires the assembly at the promoter of a large pre-initiation complex (PIC) that includes RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and the general transcription factors TFIID, TFIIA, TFIIB, TFIIF, TFIIE, and TFIIH. The size and complexity of Pol II, TFIID, and TFIIH have precluded their reconstitution from heterologous systems, and purification relies on scarce endogenous sources. Together with their conformational flexibility and the transient nature of their interactions, these limitations had precluded structural characterization of the PIC. In the last few years, however,progress in cryo–electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has made possible the visualization, at increasingly better resolution, of large PIC assemblies in different functional states. These structures can now be interpreted in near-atomic detail and provide an exciting structural framework for past and future functional studies, giving us unique mechanistic insight into the complex process of transcription initiation

Begins: 4:00 pm on May 1, 2017

Ends: 5:00 pm on May 1, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 2212 Benjamin Banneker Room (2nd floor), Stamp Student Union
Visualization of the Human Transcription Initiation Machinery ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=235
Polydopamine and its Derivatives, a Ten-Year Story of Material-Independent Surface Chemistry http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=234 Tue, 21 Feb 2017 15:36:24 +0000 dcanter Professor Haeshin Lee, Chemistry Department KAIST.

]]>
2017-04-28T11:00:00 2017-04-28T12:00:00

Polydopamine and its Derivatives, a Ten-Year Story of Material-Independent Surface Chemistry

Professor Haeshin Lee, Chemistry Department KAIST.

Begins: 11:00 am on April 28, 2017

Ends: 12:00 pm on April 28, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 0112, Marker Seminar Room, Chemistry Building (091)
Polydopamine and its Derivatives, a Ten-Year Story of Material-Independent Surface Chemistry ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=234
Utilizing Coordination-Insertion Based Polymerizations for the Synthesis of Tailored Polyolefins and Gas Separation Membranes http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=233 Fri, 17 Feb 2017 19:17:56 +0000 dcanter Professor Brian Long, University of Tennessee

ABSTRACT:

Coordination-insertion based polymerization methods provide a multitude of opportunities for enhanced control over catalytic activity, selectivity, and reactivity. Through tailored catalyst development and macromolecular design, the Long Research Group leverages these advantages to synthesize unique and/or tailored polymeric structures for a variety of applications. In this talk, we will demonstrate the potential power of these coordination-insertion based polymerization methods through two studies. First, we will provide fundamental evidence that redox-active olefin polymerization catalysts can be effectively used to modulate polyolefin microstructure and copolymer composition via simple in situ changes in a catalyst's oxidation-state. Second, we will demonstrate that careful catalyst selection can enable access to a unique class of polymers that was previously believed to be inaccessible, and that those materials are extremely attractive as highly efficient gas separation membranes.

]]>
2017-02-23T11:00:00 2017-02-23T12:00:00

Utilizing Coordination-Insertion Based Polymerizations for the Synthesis of Tailored Polyolefins and Gas Separation Membranes

Professor Brian Long, University of Tennessee

ABSTRACT:

Coordination-insertion based polymerization methods provide a multitude of opportunities for enhanced control over catalytic activity, selectivity, and reactivity. Through tailored catalyst development and macromolecular design, the Long Research Group leverages these advantages to synthesize unique and/or tailored polymeric structures for a variety of applications. In this talk, we will demonstrate the potential power of these coordination-insertion based polymerization methods through two studies. First, we will provide fundamental evidence that redox-active olefin polymerization catalysts can be effectively used to modulate polyolefin microstructure and copolymer composition via simple in situ changes in a catalyst's oxidation-state. Second, we will demonstrate that careful catalyst selection can enable access to a unique class of polymers that was previously believed to be inaccessible, and that those materials are extremely attractive as highly efficient gas separation membranes.

Begins: 11:00 am on February 23, 2017

Ends: 12:00 pm on February 23, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 0112, Marker Seminar Room, Chemistry Building (091)
Utilizing Coordination-Insertion Based Polymerizations for the Synthesis of Tailored Polyolefins and Gas Separation Membranes ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=233
Utilizing Coordination-Insertion Based Polymerizations for the Synthesis of Tailored Polyolefins and Gas Separation Membranes http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=232 Fri, 17 Feb 2017 18:53:18 +0000 dcanter Dr. Brian Long, University of Tennessee

ABSTRACT:  Coordination-insertion based polymerization methods provide a multitude of opportunities for enhanced control over catalytic activity, selectivity, and reactivity. Through tailored catalyst development and macromolecular design, the Long Research Group leverages these advantages to synthesize unique and/or tailored polymeric structures for a variety of applications. In this talk, we will demonstrate the potential power of these coordination-insertion based polymerization methods through two studies. First, we will provide fundamental evidence that redox-active olefin polymerization catalysts can be effectively used to modulate polyolefin microstructure and copolymer composition via simple in situ changes in a catalyst's oxidation-state. Second, we will demonstrate that careful catalyst selection can enable access to a unique class of polymers that was previously believed to be inaccessible, and that those materials are extremely attractive as highly efficient gas separation membranes.

]]>
2017-03-23T11:00:00 2017-03-23T12:00:00

Utilizing Coordination-Insertion Based Polymerizations for the Synthesis of Tailored Polyolefins and Gas Separation Membranes

Dr. Brian Long, University of Tennessee

ABSTRACT:  Coordination-insertion based polymerization methods provide a multitude of opportunities for enhanced control over catalytic activity, selectivity, and reactivity. Through tailored catalyst development and macromolecular design, the Long Research Group leverages these advantages to synthesize unique and/or tailored polymeric structures for a variety of applications. In this talk, we will demonstrate the potential power of these coordination-insertion based polymerization methods through two studies. First, we will provide fundamental evidence that redox-active olefin polymerization catalysts can be effectively used to modulate polyolefin microstructure and copolymer composition via simple in situ changes in a catalyst's oxidation-state. Second, we will demonstrate that careful catalyst selection can enable access to a unique class of polymers that was previously believed to be inaccessible, and that those materials are extremely attractive as highly efficient gas separation membranes.

Begins: 11:00 am on March 23, 2017

Ends: 12:00 pm on March 23, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 0112, Marker Seminar Room, Chemistry Building (091)
Utilizing Coordination-Insertion Based Polymerizations for the Synthesis of Tailored Polyolefins and Gas Separation Membranes ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=232
Protein Self-Organization in the Cell: Understanding Spatial and Temporal Regulation Through Simulation and Theory http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=227 Thu, 26 Jan 2017 22:16:08 +0000 dcanter Professor Margaret Johnson, Johns Hopkins University

]]>
2017-05-09T11:00:00 2017-05-09T12:00:00

Protein Self-Organization in the Cell: Understanding Spatial and Temporal Regulation Through Simulation and Theory

Professor Margaret Johnson, Johns Hopkins University

Begins: 11:00 am on May 9, 2017

Ends: 12:00 pm on May 9, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 0112, Marker Seminar Room, Chemistry Building (091)
Protein Self-Organization in the Cell: Understanding Spatial and Temporal Regulation Through Simulation and Theory ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=227
Mechanisms of Modulation of Adaptor Protein Binding to Membrane Phosphoinositides http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=225 Thu, 26 Jan 2017 21:31:50 +0000 dcanter Professor Daniel Capelluto, Virginia Tech

]]>
2017-04-04T11:00:00 2017-04-04T12:00:00

Mechanisms of Modulation of Adaptor Protein Binding to Membrane Phosphoinositides

Professor Daniel Capelluto, Virginia Tech

Begins: 11:00 am on April 4, 2017

Ends: 12:00 pm on April 4, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 0112, Marker Seminar Room, Chemistry Building (091)
Mechanisms of Modulation of Adaptor Protein Binding to Membrane Phosphoinositides ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=225
The Role of N6-Adenosine Methylation ion XIST-Mediated Gene Silencing http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=224 Thu, 26 Jan 2017 21:29:35 +0000 dcanter Mr. Owen Becette, UMCP, Student Seminar, (Advisor: Professor Kwaku Dayie)

]]>
2017-03-28T11:00:00 2017-03-28T12:00:00

The Role of N6-Adenosine Methylation ion XIST-Mediated Gene Silencing

Mr. Owen Becette, UMCP, Student Seminar, (Advisor: Professor Kwaku Dayie)

Begins: 11:00 am on March 28, 2017

Ends: 12:00 pm on March 28, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 0112, Marker Seminar Room, Chemistry Building (091)
The Role of N6-Adenosine Methylation ion XIST-Mediated Gene Silencing ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=224
NMR Spectral Fingerprinting of Biological Therapeutics without NMR Spectra http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=252 Thu, 26 Jan 2017 21:27:47 +0000 dcanter Dr. Frank Delaglio, NIST/IBBR

Abstract
Growth of biologic therapeutics is outpacing that of small-molecule drugs, and the development, manufacture, and delivery of biologics presents very different challenges. The efficacy and safety of biologics depends critically on their High Order Structure (HOS), and changes to HOS during manufacture or storage can render them inactive or promote dangerous immune responses. Methods to measure and characterize HOS are essential for development of new biotherapeutics, for evaluating less expensive “biosimilar” replacements, and for monitoring and improving manufacturing, formulation, and stability.
Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), which can provide detailed information on structure and dynamics at atomic resolution, is a powerful tool to probe HOS, but typical biomolecular applications use isotopic enrichment, long measurement times, and require extensive and often subjective interactive analysis by an expert.
We have shown previously that fast measurement techniques combined with Non-Uniform Sampling (NUS) strategies can generate practical two-dimensional 1H/13C spectra at natural isotopic abundance for molecules as large as intact monoclonal antibodies. We now demonstrate that HOS attributes can be classified by direct computational analysis of the shapes of such spectra, or even of NMR data without complete spectral reconstruction, as an alternative to interactive analysis and assignment of spectral features. This paves the way for NMR HOS characterization via chemometrics and machine learning that is both objective and automated.
]]>
2017-04-25T11:00:00 2017-04-25T12:00:00

NMR Spectral Fingerprinting of Biological Therapeutics without NMR Spectra

Dr. Frank Delaglio, NIST/IBBR

Abstract
Growth of biologic therapeutics is outpacing that of small-molecule drugs, and the development, manufacture, and delivery of biologics presents very different challenges. The efficacy and safety of biologics depends critically on their High Order Structure (HOS), and changes to HOS during manufacture or storage can render them inactive or promote dangerous immune responses. Methods to measure and characterize HOS are essential for development of new biotherapeutics, for evaluating less expensive “biosimilar” replacements, and for monitoring and improving manufacturing, formulation, and stability.
Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), which can provide detailed information on structure and dynamics at atomic resolution, is a powerful tool to probe HOS, but typical biomolecular applications use isotopic enrichment, long measurement times, and require extensive and often subjective interactive analysis by an expert.
We have shown previously that fast measurement techniques combined with Non-Uniform Sampling (NUS) strategies can generate practical two-dimensional 1H/13C spectra at natural isotopic abundance for molecules as large as intact monoclonal antibodies. We now demonstrate that HOS attributes can be classified by direct computational analysis of the shapes of such spectra, or even of NMR data without complete spectral reconstruction, as an alternative to interactive analysis and assignment of spectral features. This paves the way for NMR HOS characterization via chemometrics and machine learning that is both objective and automated.

Begins: 11:00 am on April 25, 2017

Ends: 12:00 pm on April 25, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 0112, Marker Seminar Room, Chemistry Building (091)
NMR Spectral Fingerprinting of Biological Therapeutics without NMR Spectra ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=252
Using Drug Synergy to Enhance Susceptibility of Cancer Cells to TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=222 Thu, 26 Jan 2017 21:26:23 +0000 dcanter Mr. Ronald McNeil, UMCP, Student Seminar, (Advisor: Professor Paul Paukstelis)

]]>
2017-02-28T11:00:00 2017-02-28T12:00:00

Using Drug Synergy to Enhance Susceptibility of Cancer Cells to TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis

Mr. Ronald McNeil, UMCP, Student Seminar, (Advisor: Professor Paul Paukstelis)

Begins: 11:00 am on February 28, 2017

Ends: 12:00 pm on February 28, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 0112, Marker Seminar Room, Chemistry Building (091)
Using Drug Synergy to Enhance Susceptibility of Cancer Cells to TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=222
Foreign dsDNA-Sensing Mechanisms of AIM2-Like Receptors http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=221 Thu, 26 Jan 2017 21:23:44 +0000 dcanter Dr. Jungsan Sohn, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

]]>
2017-02-21T11:00:00 2017-02-21T12:00:00

Foreign dsDNA-Sensing Mechanisms of AIM2-Like Receptors

Dr. Jungsan Sohn, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Begins: 11:00 am on February 21, 2017

Ends: 12:00 pm on February 21, 2017

Recurrance: Does not recur

Repetition: 0 times

Room 0112, Marker Seminar Room, Chemistry Building (091)
Foreign dsDNA-Sensing Mechanisms of AIM2-Like Receptors ]]>
text/html http://www.chem.umd.edu http://www.chem.umd.edu/whats-new/calendar/?mc_id=221