Graduate Courses

Below is a list of upper-level undergraduate (400+) and graduate (600+) courses offered by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, together with information about when each course has been offered during the past three years, and who has taught it.

Biochemistry Courses

BCHM 461 Biochemistry I (3 credits)

Prerequisite: {CHEM271 and CHEM272} or {CHEM276 and CHEM277} or {CHEM113 and CHEM241 andCHEM242}. A grade of C (2.0) or better is required in all prerequisites. Notopen to students who have completed BCHM261 or BCHM463. Credit will be grantedfor only one of the following: BCHM261, BCHM461, or BCHM463. 
First semester ofa comprehensive introduction to modern biochemistry. Structure, chemical properties,and function of proteins and enzymes, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids.Basic enzyme kinetics and catalytic mechanisms.

  • Hansen: Fall 07
  • Gerratana: Fall 07, Fall 08, Fall 09
  • Cropp: Spring 08, Fall 08,Spring 10
  • Tugarinov: Spring 08, Spring 09, Spring 10
  • Montague-Smith: Spring 09
  • LaRonde-LeBlanc: Fall 09

BCHM 462 Biochemistry II (3 credits)

Prerequisite: BCHM461. A grade of C or better in the prerequisite is required for Life Science majors and recommended for all students. Not open to students who have completed BCHM463. Credit will be granted for only one of the following: BCHM462 or BCHM463. 
A continuation of BCHM 461. Metabolic pathways and metabolic regulation, energy transduction in biological systems, enzyme catalytic mechanisms.

  • Lorimer: Fall 07, Fall 08
  • Hansen: Spring 08
  • Rokita: Spring 08, Spring09, Spring 10
  • Julin: Spring 09, Fall 09

BCHM 463 Biochemistry of Physiology (3 credits)

Prerequisite: {CHEM271 and CHEM272} or {CHEM276 and CHEM277} or {CHEM113 and CHEM241 and CHEM242}. A grade of C (2.0) or better is required in all prerequisites. Not open to students who have completed BCHM461 or BCHM462. Credit will be grantedfor only one of the following: BCHM463 or {BCHM461 or BCHM462}. 
A one-semester introduction to general biochemistry. A study of protein structure, enzyme catalysis, metabolism, and metabolic regulation with respect to their relationship to physiology.

  • Ebrahimian: Fall 07, Spring 08, Fall 08, Spring 09
  • Fenselau: Fall 07, Fall 09
  • Hansen: Fall 08
  • Watson: Fall 09, Spring 10

BCHM 464 Biochemistry Laboratory (3 credits)

One hour of lecture and five hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BCHM461 or BCHM463. A grade of C or better in the prerequisite is required for Life Science majors and recommended for all students. Corequisite: BCHM465. BCHM, CHEM and Nutritional Sciences majors have first priority, followed by other life science majors. 
Biochemical and genetic methods for studying protein function.Site-directed mutagenesis and molecular cloning, protein purification, enzyme activity assays, computer modeling of protein structure.

  • Ebrahimian: Fall 07, Spring 08, Fall 08, Spring 09
  • Watson: Fall 09, Spring 10

BCHM 465 Biochemistry III (3 credits)

Prerequisite: BCHM461or BCHM463. A grade of C or better in the prerequisite is required for Life Science majors and recommended for all students. Corequisite: BCHM464.Recommended: BCHM462. 
CORE Capstone (CS) Course. An advanced course in biochemistry. Biochemical approach to cellular information processing. DNA and RNA structure. DNA replication, transcription, and repair. Translation of mRNA tomake proteins.

  • Beckett: Fall 07, Fall 09
  • Julian: Spring 08, Spring10
  • Kahn: Fall 08
  • Dayie: Spring 09

BCHM 485 Physical Biochemistry (3 credits)

Prerequisite: A grade of C or better is required in CHEM481. For BCHM majors only. Credit will be granted for only one of the following: CHEM482 or BCHM485. 
The application of physical chemistry to biological systems. Principal topics: statistical mechanics, transport processes in liquid phase, chemical and biochemical kinetics, modeling and simulation, polymer dynamics. Usually offered during the Spring semester.

  • Fushman: Spring 08, Spring 09, Spring 10

CHEM 648D Chemistry of Biological Catalysis (3 credits)

Prerequisites: 2 semesters of undergraduate organic chemistry. Biological catalysts and their components will be described through the principles of organic chemistry. Course material will be organized from the perspective of mechanism rather than metabolism or control. Examples from each major class of enzymes and reaction type will be presented. Additional topics may include molecular recognition, substrate activation and enzyme inhibition.

  • Rokita: Fall 09

BCHM 669 SpecialTopics in Biochemistry (1-3 credits)

Prerequisite: BCHM462 or equivalent.

BCHM 669A Methods for Protein Structure Determination (3 credits)

Prerequisite: calculus, undergraduate level biochemistry and physical chemistry. This graduate level course is designed as an introduction to modern methods for biomolecular structure determination at the atomic level resolution. The course covers the theory and basic principles underlying of the two major high-resolution experimental methods: X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Usually offered in the Fall of even years by Profs. Vitali Tugarinov or David Fushman.

  • Tugarinov: Fall 08

BCHM 669A Practical Approaches to Enzymology (3 credits)

Prerequisite: undergraduate level biochemistry, organic chemistry and biophysical chemistry. The course provides the student with the necessary knowledge on enzyme kinetics, on methodologies andtheir applications to determine the mechanism and kinetics of enzyme catalyzed reactions. Usually offered in the Spring of even years by Prof. Barbara Gerratana.

  • Gerratana: Spring 08, Spring 10

BCHM 671 Protein Chemistry and Enzymic Catalysis (3 credits)

Prerequisite: BCHM416 or equivalent. 
Principles of protein structure, folding, and function, xperimental characterization of structure, active sites, enzyme mechanisms and kinetics.

  • LaRonde-LeBlanc: Fall 07, Fall 08
  • Lorimer: Fall 09

BCHM 673 Regulation of Metabolism (3 credits)

Prerequisite: BCHM674 or equivalent and BCHM 671 or equivalent. Selected topics in the signal transduction and the control of biological function. Topics have included transcriptional regulation by nuclear hormone receptors,bacterial chemotaxis, insulin signaling, and diabetes, G proteins and G-protein coupled receptors, and the identification, modeling, and emergent properties of gene regulatory networks. The class is a combination of lectures, class discussions of the literature, and student presentations. The course is usually offered in the Fall of odd years by Profs. Jason Kahn or Doug Julin.

  • Kahn: Fall 07

BCHM 674 Nucleic Acids (3 credits)

Prerequisite: BSCI410 or equivalent. 
Chemistry of nucleotides and polynucleotides, sequencing and organization of genomes, experimental methods. DNA replication, repair, and recombination. RNA synthesis and processing, regulation of gene expression.

  • Julin: Fall 07, Fall 08
  • Dayie: Fall 09

BCHM 675 Biophysical Chemistry (3 credits)

Prerequisites: BCHM461 and CHEM 481 or equivalent. 
Conformation, shape, structure, conformational changes, dynamics and interactions of biological macromolecules and complexesor arrays of macromolecules. Physical techniques for studying properties of biological macromolecules.

  • Beckett: Spring 08, Spring 09, Spring 10

BCHM 676 Biological Mass Spectrometry (3 credits)

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite: BCHM461 or BCHM463. Formerly BCHM669B. Fundamentals of modern mass spectrometry and use with biochemical techniques to provide unique analyses of drug metabolites, lipids, carbohydrates,nucleotides and proteins. The interface with bioinformatics will be examined, which provides the foundation of proteomics.

  • Fenselau: Spring 08, Spring 09, Spring 10

BCHM 677 Computational Tools in Biochemistry (1 credit)

Prerequisites: BCHM674 and BCHM 671, or comparable courses in nucleic acid and protein structure and the permission of the coordinator. A practical, hands-on Introduction to the application of computational tools that support biochemistry research. Selected topics may include the following:(1) efficient use of scientific literature databases and the preparation of professional bibliographies; (2) proteomics and mass spectrometry; (3) bioinformatics and genomics programs and database resources; (4) molecular structure visualization and modeling; (5) quantitative data fitting and error analysis; and (6) laboratory research ethics. The class is intended for first-year graduate students in the Biochemistry program.

  • Beckett: Winter 09
  • Kahn: Spring 08 (offered as BCHM 669X), Winter 10

BCHM 699 Special Problems in Biochemistry (1-6 credits)

Prerequisite: one semester of graduate study in biochemistry. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. 
Laboratory experience in a research environment. Restricted to students in the non-thesis M.S. option.

BCHM 799 Master’s Thesis Research (1-6 credits)

BCHM 889 Seminar (1-3 credits)

Fall 07, Spring 08, Fall 08, Spring 09, Fall 09, Spring 10

BCHM 898 Pre-Candidacy Research (1-8 credits)

BCHM 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (6 credits)


Chemistry Courses

CHEM 401 Inorganic Chemistry (3 credits)

Prerequisite: {CHEM241 and CHEM242} or CHEM243 or CHEM247. 
An overview of basic concepts ofthe electronic structure of the elements, chemical bonding and reactivity, fromsimple diatomic molecules to coordination compounds. These are viewed fromsimple (Lewis) to the most comprehensive molecular orbital theory. Symmetry andgroup theory are used throughout the course.

  • Sita: Spring 08, Spring 09, Spring 10

CHEM 403 Radiochemistry (3 credits)

Prerequisite: one year of college chemistry and one year of college physics. 
Radioactive decay; introduction to properties of atomic nuclei; nuclear processes in cosmology; chemical, biomedical and environmental applications of radioactivity; nuclear processes as chemical tools; interaction of radiation with matter.

  • Walters: Fall 07
  • Mignerey: Fall08, Fall 09

CHEM 425 Instrumental Methods of Analysis (4 credits)

Two hours of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: {CHEM153 or CHEM227} or{CHEM271 and CHEM272} or {CHEM276 and CHEM277}. 
Modern instrumentation inanalytical chemistry. Electronics, spectroscopy, chromatography and electrochemistry.

  • Blough: Fall 07, Fall 08,Fall 09
  • S-B Lee: Spring 08, Spring09
  • Ondov: Spring 10

CHEM434 Air Pollution (3 credits)

Prerequisite: CHEM131or MATH241; or permission of department. Production,transformation, transport and removal of air pollutants. The problems of photochemical smog, the greenhouse effect, stratospheric ozone, acid rain and visibility. Analytical techniques for gases and particles. Also offered as AOSC434.

  • Salawitch:Spring 08, Spring 09 (with Canty), Spring 10

CHEM 441 Advanced Organic Chemistry (3 credits)

Prerequisite: CHEM481. Also offered as CHEM641. 
An advanced study ofthe compounds of carbon, with special emphasis on molecular orbital theory andorganic reaction mechanisms.

  • Falvey: Fall 07
  • DeShong: Fall 08, Fall 09

CHEM 450 Ethics in Science and Engineering (3 credits)

Prerequisite: 8 credits laboratory science or permission ofdepartment. 
Ethical issues in science and their resolutions. Topics will beethics and scientific truth, ethics and other scientists, and ethics and society.

  • Greer:Spring 08

CHEM 460 Structure Determination Using Spectroscopic Methods (3 credits)

Prerequisite:{CHEM243 or CHEM247} or {CHEM241 or CHEM242}. Formerly CHEM660. 
The use of infrared, ultraviolet-visible, proton and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy for structure determination in organic chemistry.

  • Isaacs: Spring 08
  • Falvey:Spring 09, Fall 09

CHEM 471 Techniques in Pulse NMR (1 credit)

Prerequisite: CHEM241/CHEM242 or CHEM247. Recommended: CHEM460. Persons with heart pacemakers and/or metal implants cannot take the course due to potential health hazards. For Senior undergraduate and graduate students. NMR techniques to operate, adjust, and calibrate the spectrometers and acquire and process NMR data in one and two dimensional NMR applications. Students who wish to register must have the instructors permission.

  • Lam: Winter 09, Winter 10

CHEM 474 Environmental Chemistry (3 credits)

Prerequisite: CHEM481 or equivalent. 
The sources of various elements and chemical reactions between them in the atmosphere and hydrosphere are treated. Causes and biological effects of air and water pollution by certain elements are discussed. Usually offered during theFall semester.

  • Ondov: Fall 07, Fall 08, Fall 09

CHEM 481 Physical Chemistry I (3 credits)

Prerequisite: A gradeof C or better in CHEM113, CHEM135, or CHEM153, or (CHEM271 and CHEM272), or(CHEM276 and CHEM277); and MATH141 and PHYS142. The “C” or better in prerequisites is required for Life Science majors. 
A course primarily for chemists and chemical engineers.

  • English: Fall 07
  • Reutt-Robey: Spring 08
  • Walker: Fall 08
  • Jarzynski: Spring 09
  • Alexander: Fall 09
  • Wang: Spring 10

CHEM 482 Physical Chemistry II (3 credits)

Prerequisite: A Grade of C or better in CHEM481. The “C” or better is required for Life Science majors. 
A course primarily for chemists and chemical engineers.

  • Kosov: Fall 07, Spring 08,Fall 08
  • Reutt-Robey:Spring 09, Spring 10
  • Mullin:Fall 09

CHEM 483 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I (2 credits)

Corequisite: CHEM481. 
An introduction to the principles andapplication of quantitative techniques in physical chemical measurements. Experiments will be coordinated with topics in CHEM481.

  • Klassen: Fall 07, Spring 08,Fall 08, Spring 09
  • Coyle: Fall 09, Spring 10

CHEM 484 Physical Chemistry Laboratory II (2 credits)

Prerequisite: CHEM481 and CHEM483. Corequisite: CHEM482. 
Acontinuation of CHEM 483. Advanced quantitative techniques necessary in physical chemical measurements. Experiments will be coordinated with topics inCHEM 482.

  • Klassen: Fall 07, Spring 08,Fall 08, Spring 09
  • Coyle:Fall 09, Spring 10

CHEM 498 Special Topics in Chemistry (3 credits)

Prerequisite varies with the nature of the topic being considered. Course may be repeated for credit if the subject matter is substantially different, but not more than three credits may be accepted in satisfaction of major supporting area requirements for chemistry majors.


CHEM498B Descriptive Chemistry of the Elements (3 credits)

The modern society utilizes virtually all the known stable chemical elements and many of the radioactive isotopes as well. At the same time, students are typically taught chemistry of carbon only (organic chemistry) and have virtually no knowledge of chemistry of other elements. In the course “Descriptive Chemistry of the Elements” students come to know some fundamental properties of the elements and their compounds. The course is based on many facts including the most recent reports from research labs that constantly appear in the top chemistry journals and constantly change our understanding of what is possible and what is not possible in chemistry. The origin of the elements is given in the beginning of the course. Next, assuming that the organization of the Periodic Table of the Elements is known to the students, chemistry of the elements of groups 1-18, lanthanides and actinides is discussed. A special consideration is given to the elements that have currently found important applications, and/or whose utility and chemistry demonstrates a rapid growth, that demonstrate unusual types of bonding, reactivity and structure. Vertical, horizontal and diagonal trends in the elements most typical chemical and physical properties will be discussed throughout the course whenever it is appropriate.

  • Vedernikov: Spring 10

CHEM498E Entrepreneurship in Chemical and Life Sciences (3 credits)

    • Chase: Fall 07


  • Connolly and Khachik: Spring 09,Spring 10

CHEM 601 Structure and Bonding of Molecules and Materials (3 credits)

Development of the tools necessary to use the knowledge of structure and bonding of molecules and solids in the practice of synthetic inorganic and materials chemistry. Several bonding models are covered, from the simple valence bond and ligand field models to a quantitative group theoretical treatment of molecular orbital theory and band structure descriptions of solids. Concepts of electron counting and oxidation state and ligand characteristics are revisited in terms of the more sophisticated bonding models. Finally, these models are used to analyzethe reactivity, magnetic and spectroscopic properties of inorganic coordination compounds. Prior advanced inorganic and/or advanced quantum chemistry courses are not prerequisites.

 

    • Eichhorn: Fall 07


  • Sita: Fall 08, Fall 09

CHEM 602 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry II (3 credits)

Prerequisite: CHEM601 or permission of instructor. 
A continuation of CHEM 601 with emphasis on the application of contemporary spectroscopic techniques to inorganic problems.

  • Eichhorn: Spring 08, Spring 09

CHEM 608 SelectedTopics in Inorganic Chemistry (1-3 credits)

Prerequisite: CHEM601 and CHEM 602, or equivalent. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs.Topics of special interest and current importance.

CHEM608. Selected Topics in Inorganic Chemistry: Organotransition Metal Chemistry and Catalysis

In the course a review of classical and modern organotransition metal chemistry is given. In the first part of the course major types of ligand are considered. Analysis of transition metal (TM)   ligand bonding modes and synthesis of derived TM complexes, review of their reactivity are included. Next, the most important organometallic reactions are discussed. In the final part of the course various applications of organotransition metal complexes in catalysis are reviewed.

  • Vedernikov: Spring 09

CHEM 608M Nanoparticle Aerosol Dynamics (3 credits)

 

  • Zachariah: Spring 08, Spring 10

CHEM 611 Professional Skills for New Graduate Students (1 credit)

 

  • Fourkas: Fall 08, Fall 09

CHEM 612 Giving Scientific Presentations (1 credit)

Covers the basics of giving scientific presentations. Learn how to give ahigh-quality group meeting or a poster or short oral presentation at a meeting.

  • Fourkas: Winter 09, Winter 10

CHEM 623 Optical Methods of Quantitative Analysis (3 credits)

Prerequisites: CHEM421 and CHEM 482 or equivalent. 
The quantitative applications of various methods of optical spectroscopy.

  • Blough: Spring 08, Spring 09, Spring 10

CHEM 624 Electrical Methods of Quantitative Analysis (3 credits)

Prerequisites: CHEM 421 and CHEM 482 or equivalent. 
The use of conductivity, potentiometry,polarography, voltammetry, amperometry, coulometry, and chronopotentiometry in quantitative analysis.

  • S-B Lee: Fall 07, Fall08

CHEM 625 Separation Methods in Quantitative Analysis (3 credits)

Prerequisites: CHEM421 and CHEM 482 or equivalent. 
The theory and application for quantitative analysis of various forms of chromatography, ion exchange, solvent extraction,distillation, and mass spectroscopy.

  • C Lee: Spring 09,Spring 10

CHEM 640 Problems in Organic Reaction Mechanisms (1 credit)

A tutorial typecourse dealing with the basic description of the fundamentals of writing organic reaction mechanisms.

  • Falvey: Fall 07
  • DeShong: Fall 08, Winter 09
  • Sintim: Fall 09,Winter 10

CHEM 641 Organic Reaction Mechanisms (3 credits)

Prerequisite:CHEM481. Also offered as CHEM641. 
An advanced study of the compounds ofcarbon, with special emphasis on molecular orbital theory and organic reaction mechanisms.

  • Falvey: Fall 07
  • DeShong: Fall 08, Fall 09

CHEM 647 Organic Synthesis (3 credits)

The use of newreagents in organic reactions; multistep syntheses leading to natural productsof biological interest; stereospecific and regiospecific reactions and their use in total synthesis. Usually offered during the Spring semester.

  • Sintim: Spring 08,Spring 09, Spring 10

CHEM 648 Special Topics in Organic Chemistry (1-3 credits)

Repeatable to 9 credits if content differs. 
Topicsof special interest and current importance.

CHEM 648 Medicinal Chemistry (3 credits)

 

  • DeShong: Spring 10

CHEM 648A Research Ethics (2 credits)

 

  • Greer: Spring 08

CHEM 648B Biological Catalysis (1-3 credits)

 

  • Cropp: Fall 07

CHEM 648B Chemistry of Nucleic Acids (1-3 credits)

  • Rokita: Fall 08

CHEM 648C Supramolecular Chemistry (1-3 credits)

  • Davis: Spring 08

CHEM 648D Chemistry of Biological Catalysis (3 credits)

Prerequisites: 2semesters of undergraduate organic chemistry. Biological catalysts and their components will be described through the principles of organic chemistry. Course material will be organized from the perspective of mechanism rather than metabolism or control. Examples from each major class of enzymes and reaction type will be presented. Additional topics may include molecular recognition, substrate activation and enzyme inhibition.

  • Rokita: Fall 09

CHEM 648X LibraryResearch (1 credit)

  • DeShong: Fall 07,Winter 09

CHEM 650 Problems in Organic Synthesis (1 credits)

A tutorial type course dealing with mechanistic problems from the current literature of organicsysnthesis.

  • Sintim: Spring 08,Spring 09
  • Davis: Spring 10

CHEM 678 Special Topics in Environmental Chemistry (3 credits)

Prerequisite: CHEM474. Repeatable to 6 credits if content differs. 
In-depth treatment ofenvironmental chemistry problem areas of current research interest. The topicswill vary somewhat from year to year.

CHEM 678A Air Pollution (3 credits)

Also offered asAOSC658R.

  • Salawitch: Spring 08,Spring 09 (with Canty), Spring 10

CHEM 682 Advanced Kinetics (3 credits)

  • Mullin: Spring 08,Spring 09

CHEM 684 Chemical Thermodynamics (3 credits)

Prerequisite: CHEM482 or equivalent.

  • Jarzynski: Fall 07, Fall08, Fall 09

CHEM 687 Statistical Mechanics and Chemistry (3 credits)

Prerequisite: CHEM 684 or equivalent.

  • Alexander: Spring 08,Spring 09
  • Weeks: Spring 10

CHEM 689 Special Topics in Physical Chemistry (3 credits)

Repeatable to 9credits if content differs.

CHEM 689 Instrument Interfacing (3 credits)

  • Fourkas: Fall 07

CHEM 689A Simulation and Theory of Liquids (3 credits)

  • Weeks: Fall 07,Fall 08 (with Liu)

CHEM 690 Quantum Chemistry I (3 credits)

Prerequisite: CHEM485.

  • Mullin: Fall 07
  • Wang: Fall 08, Fall09

CHEM 691 Quantum Chemistry II (3 credits)

Prerequisite: CHEM690 or PHYS 622.

  • Walker: Spring 08,Spring 09
  • Alexander: Spring 10

CHEM 698 Literature Seminar in Chemistry (1 credits)

For CHEM majors only.Students will prepare and present a departmental seminar baseed on a topic inthe current research literature.

  • Sintim: Spring 08

CHEM 699 Special Problems in Chemistry (1-6 credits)

Prerequisite: one semester of graduate study in chemistry. Restricted to students in the non-thesis M.S. option. Repeatable to 6 credits. 
Laboratory experience in a research environment.

CHEM699A Biological Mass Spectrometry (3 credits)

Also offered as BCHM676 and BIOE689B.

  • Fenselau:Spring 08, Spring 09, Spring 10

CHEM 705 NuclearChemistry (3 credits)

Nuclear structuremodels, radioactive decay processes, nuclear reactions in complex nuclei,fission, nucleosynthesis and nuclear particle accelerators. Usually offered during the Spring semester.

  • Mignerey: Spring 08, Spring 09, Spring 10

CHEM 799 Master’s Thesis Research (1-6 credits)

CHEM 889 Seminar (1credit)

CHEM 889AAnalytical, Nuclear and Environmental Chemistry (1 credit)

Fall 07, Spring 08, Fall 08, Spring 09, Fall 09, Spring 10

CHEM 889C Inorganic Chemistry (1 credit)

Fall 07, Spring 08, Fall 08, Spring 09, Fall 09, Spring 10

CHEM 889D Organic Chemistry (1 credit)

Fall 07, Spring 08, Fall 08, Spring 09, Fall 09, Spring 10

CHEM 889E Physical Chemistry / Chemical Physics (1 credit)

Fall 07, Spring 08, Fall 08, Spring 09, Fall 09, Spring 10

CHEM 898 Pre-Candidacy Research (1-8 credits)

CHEM 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (6 credits)

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