environmental_chemistryThe Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Maryland conducts an extensive range of laboratory, field, and computer modeling efforts in the area of Environmental Chemistry, all designed to quantify the impact of human activity on the environment, ultimately leading to a more sustainable future.

The faculty members in environmental chemistry (Blough, Dickerson, Mignerey, Mullin, Ondov, Salawitch, and Zachariah) are leaders in their fields of research. Their research efforts involve support and or collaboration with many of the federal laboratories in the area, including the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Department of Agriculture. and the Environmental Protection Agency. The University of Maryland provides an environment for discovery and innovation over a wide range of environmental sciences. Research efforts involve formation transformation of atmospheric aerosols, the effect of pollution on watersheds and the atmosphere, the kinetics of chemical processes involved with the transformation of pollutants, as well as the application of analytical techniques to identify chemicals in fingerprints that might act as molecular chronometers.


Photo of Neil Blough

Neil Blough

Photochemical and free radical reactions in condensed phases; development of molecular probes to examine these reactions in biological and environmental systems; optical properties and the remote sensing of seawater constituents

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Photochemical and free radical reactions in condensed phases; development of molecular probes to examine these reactions in biological and environmental systems; optical properties and the remote sensing of seawater constituents

Photo of Alice Mignerey

Alice Mignerey

Relativistic and ultra-relativistic heavy-ion-induced nuclear reactions, part of the Phobos experiment at the Brookhaven National Laboratory RHIC; application of accelerator mass spectrometry to environmental problems

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Relativistic and ultra-relativistic heavy-ion-induced nuclear reactions, part of the Phobos experiment at the Brookhaven National Laboratory RHIC; application of accelerator mass spectrometry to environmental problems

Photo of Amy Mullin

Amy Mullin

Reactivity and dynamics of high energy molecules; molecules in strong fields; molecular collisions; surface-enhanced spectroscopy; high-resolution time-resolved laser probes

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Reactivity and dynamics of high energy molecules; molecules in strong fields; molecular collisions; surface-enhanced spectroscopy; high-resolution time-resolved laser probes

Photo of John Ondov

John Ondov

Measurements of sub-micrometer aerosol particles; particulate tracer science; particle deposition; tracers of atmospheric particles; development of semi-continuous monitor for airborne metals; nuclear analytical methods and nuclear forensics; radiocarbon analyses of single compounds

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Measurements of sub-micrometer aerosol particles; particulate tracer science; particle deposition; tracers of atmospheric particles; development of semi-continuous monitor for airborne metals; nuclear analytical methods and nuclear forensics; radiocarbon analyses of single compounds

Photo of Ross Salawitch

Ross Salawitch

Computer modeling of the effects of human activity on atmospheric composition with an emphasis on ozone depletion, air quality, climate change, and the global carbon cycle

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Computer modeling of the effects of human activity on atmospheric composition with an emphasis on ozone depletion, air quality, climate change, and the global carbon cycle

Photo of Michael Zachariah

Michael Zachariah

Aerosol nanoparticle physics and chemistry; nanostructured materials; development of chemical and physical characterization for nanoparticles; nanomaterials in energy applications

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Aerosol nanoparticle physics and chemistry; nanostructured materials; development of chemical and physical characterization for nanoparticles; nanomaterials in energy applications

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