Introductory courses are defined as the courses taken during the first four terms of study by a student who begins their study of chemistry at the level of the first course taught by the Department.

Students with Advanced Placement credit or transfer credit may receive credit for one or more of the introductory courses.

Introductory courses are taken by students in many majors other that chemistry or biochemistry. You should consult with an advisor from your major department or program to ensure that you are taking the correct courses.

Introductory Chemistry Courses

CHEM131 – Chemistry I – Fundamentals of General Chemistry

Credits: 3
An overview of the Periodic Table, inorganic substances, ionic and covalent bonding, bulk properties of materials, chemical equilibrium, and quantitative chemistry. CHEM131 is the first course in a four-semester sequence for students majoring in the sciences, other than Chemistry and Biochemistry majors.

CHEM132 – General Chemistry I Laboratory

Credits: 1
Introduction to the quantification of chemical substances, including the concept of the mole and chemical stoichiometry. Additional work involves the synthesis of ionic substances and their qualitative characterization. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM131.

CHEM135 – General Chemistry for Engineers

Credits: 3
The nature and composition of matter, solutions, chemical reactions, equilibria, and electrochemistry, with applications to various fields of engineering.

CHEM136 – General Chemistry Laboratory for Engineers

Credits: 1
A laboratory course for engineering majors intending to take CHEM231 and CHEM232.

CHEM146 – Principles of General Chemistry

Credits: 3
An overview of the Periodic Table, inorganic substances, ionic and covalent bonding, bulk properties of materials, chemical equilibrium, and quantitative chemistry. CHEM146 is the first course in a four-semester sequence for Chemistry and Biochemistry majors.

CHEM177 – Introduction to Laboratory Practices and Research in the Chemical Sciences

Credits: 2
First semester laboratory course required for CHEM and BCHM majors. Introduction to laboratory techniques, including safety practices, scientific ethics, and presentation of current research topics.

CHEM231 – Organic Chemistry I

Credits: 3
The chemistry of carbon: aliphatic compounds, aromatic compounds, stereochemistry, arenes, halides, alcohols, esters and spectroscopy.

CHEM232 – Organic Chemistry Laboratory I

Credits: 1
Provides experience in developing some basic laboratory techniques, recrystallization, distillation, extraction, chromatography.
Laboratory sessions will begin after the first lecture of CHEM 231. Students must pay a $40.00 laboratory materials fee.

CHEM237 – Principles of Organic Chemistry I

Credits: 4
The chemistry of carbons: aliphatic compounds, aromatic compounds, stereochemistry, arenes, halides, alcohols, esters, and spectroscopy.

CHEM241 – Organic Chemistry II

Credits: 3
A continuation of CHEM231 with emphasis on molecular structure; substitution reactions; carbonium ions; aromaticity; synthetic processes; macromolecules.

CHEM242 – Organic Chemistry Laboratory II

Credits: 1
Synthetic organic chemistry through functional group manipulation, introduction to instrumentation essential to analysis and structure elucidation.

CHEM247 – Principles of Organic Chemistry II

Credits: 4
A continuation of CHEM237 with emphasis on molecular structure, substitution reactions; carbonium ions; aromaticity; synthetic processes; macromolecules.

CHEM271 – General Chemistry and Energetics

Credits: 2
An introduction to the physical aspects of chemistry; chemical kinetics thermodynamics and electrochemistry in the context of current chemistry research.

CHEM272 – General Bioanalytical Chemistry Laboratory

Credits: 2
An introduction to analytical chemistry with an emphasis on bio-analytical instrumentation and techniques.

CHEM277 – Fundamentals of Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry Laboratory

Credits: 3
Quantitative analysis, inorganic analytical chemistry, and an introduction to bio-analytical instrumentation and techniques.

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